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The Jack Rabbit Chess Report for January 21: A wild and windy week in Wijk

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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-21-07 03:50 PM
Original message
The Jack Rabbit Chess Report for January 21: A wild and windy week in Wijk
Edited on Sun Jan-21-07 04:27 PM by Jack Rabbit

The Jack Rabbit Chess Report
for the week ending January 21



Image: Honor Daumier, The Chess Players (c. 1865)
from The Artchive

Contents

Post 1: News for the week
Post 2: Diagrams and other features
Post 3: Games from Wijk aan Zee



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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-21-07 03:53 PM
Response to Original message
1. News for the week ending January 21
Edited on Sun Jan-21-07 04:31 PM by Jack Rabbit
The Wild, Wild Wijk: Topalov takes lead in Corus A



Former FIDE world champion Veselin Topalov of Bulgaria defeated Indian grandmaster Vishy Anand today while 19-year-old Teimour Radjabov fell to Armenian grandmaster Levon Aronian today, allowing Topalov to take the lead by a half-point in the category 19 A Group after eight rounds of the Corus International Tournament in the the Dutch village of Wijk aan Zee.

It was Radjabov's first defeat of the tournament. He had held a clear lead on the table since Round 3 on Monday. Aronian, playing Black, took Radjabov to a Knight and pawn ending with an extra pawn which he nursed to victory. Radjabov, faced with the choice of losing his Knight or allowing Black to queen his passed pawn, resigned on his 66th move.

Topalov, the highest-ranked player in the world, took down Anand, the world's number 2, in 35 moves with the White pieces.

Topalov has 6 points in eight rounds to Radjabov's 5. In a four-way logjam in third place at 5 points apiece are: Aronian; world champion Vladimir Kramnik; 17-year-old Sergey Karjakin of Ukraine, who defeated Czech grandmaster David Navara today; and Peter Svidler, who today defeated his fellow Russian grandmaster, Alexander Molytov.

The lead Group B has been particularly volatile, with player or group of players holding first place two days in row. As of now, 16-year-old French grandmaster Maxime Vachier-Lagrave, who defeated Dutch grandmaster Erwin L'Ami in 31 moves today, is alone in first place with 6 points, followed by Pavel Eljanov of Ukraine with 5. Vachier-Lagrave and Eljanov shared the lead after yesterday's action. In third place is Bu Xiangzhi of China, who defeated young Vachier-Lagrave in a a beautiful game in Round 3 on Monday.

Sixteen-year-old Ian Nepomniachtchi of Russia (one more time, that's yahn nay powm NYACH chee) is pulling away from the pack in Group C with 7 points, with Sweden's Emanuel Berg in second with 6 points. The only blemish on young Nepomniachtchi's record is a draw against Berg in the third round. The highest ranked grandmaster in Group C, Michal Krasenkow of Poland, is in third place with 5 points.

Nepomniachtchi is currently an international master and needs only another point and a half in Wijk aan Zee to gain a grandmaster norm.

In addition to the tournament standings, some wildness was provided by the weather as storm Cyrill hit the North Sea, battering Wijk aan Zee Wednesday. Live game transmission on the official website appeared to have been affected by the storm.



Cyrill at the Beach in Wijk aan Zee on Wednesday
Photo: ChessBase.de (Germany)



Team Topalov gets new bank guarantee for title re-match



Silvio Danailov, manager for former FIDE world champion Veselin Topalov, has passed a US$2 million from the Bulbank of Sofia, Bulgaria to FIDE, the world governing body of chess, in order to arrange a match between Topalov and world champion Vladimir Kramnik.

Last week, the Union Bank of Switzerland, acting on behalf of FIDE, rejected a guarantee from the D Commerce Bank of Sofia and instructed Danailov to get a guarantee from one of four banks approved by UBS. Bulbank is one of the banks named.

The guarantee will expire on April 30.

Topalov and Danailov are hoping to organize a match in Sofia in April.


Calendar



The Gibraltar Chess Festival, sponsored by the telecommunications company Gibtelecom, begins this Tuesday in Gibraltar and will run thru Thursday February 1. The main event is a Swiss system tournament open to masters and grandmasters. Among this year's participants are: Britain's Mickey Adams, the ninth ranked player in the world; former US champion Hikaru Nakamura; chess legend and senior world champion Viktor Korchnoi of Switzerland; Swedish grandmaster Pia Cramling, the world third-rank woman player; and former women's world champions Zhu Chen of Qatar and Anoaneta Stefanova of Bulgaria.

The Aeroflot Open, sponsored by the Russian airline, is scheduled for Tuesday February 13 thru Friday February 23 in Moscow. Among the confirmed participants in this year's event are rising Russian star Dmitry Jakovenko;, Spanish grandmaster Paco Vallejo; girls' junior world champion Shen Yang of China, the world's youngest grandmaster, 13-year-old Parimarjan Negi of India; Katya Lahno of Ukraine, who defeated Negi in a match in December; and Chinese prodigy Hou Yifan, who will turn 13 a few days after the completion of the event.

The annual Torneo Ciudad de Linares will again this year be held in two parts on two continents. The tournament begins in Morelia, Michoacn (Mexico) on Friday February 16. The players will break after the seventh round Febuary 25 and reassemble in Linares, Andaluca (Spain) on March 2 and complete the event on March 16. The grandmasters in this years event are: Veselin Topalov (Bulgaria), Vishy Anand (India), Peter Leko (Hungary), Peter Svidler (Russia), Levon Aronian (Armenia), Teimour Radjabov (Azerbaijan), 16-year-old Magnus Carlsen (Norway) and Alexander Morozevich (Russia).


Social Page: Champ marries French journalist



Mr. and Mrs. Vladimir Kramnik
Photo: Pravda (Russia)

Found today on the German edition of the website ChessBase: World chess champion Vladimir Kramnik married French journalist Marie-Laure Germon on December 30.

The couple have been seen together in public for several weeks. The bride works for the French newspaper, Le Figaro.

Congratulations to the Kramniks.
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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-21-07 03:54 PM
Response to Original message
2. Diagrams and other features of the JR Chess Report

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White to move
This position is a theoretical draw

Does this picture make sense to you? If not, or if it looks like a bunch of Wingdings, please click here.

Diagrams used in the Jack Rabbit Chess Report are made with Chess Merida, a true type font that is available as freeware at the above link.

Also, the JR chess report makes the main variation in annotations more distinct and readable by putting it in red. A secondary variation, is in blue and other colors are used if needed.

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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-21-07 03:56 PM
Response to Original message
3. Games from the Corus Internation Tournament, Wijk aan Zee 2007
Edited on Sun Jan-21-07 04:25 PM by Jack Rabbit

Chess Games
Analysis by JR and Fritz

Alexei Shirov - Teimour Radjabov, Corus International Tournament, Group A, Round 3, Wijk aan Zee
Alexander Molytov - Vishy Anand, Corus International Tournament, Group A, Round 2, Wijk aan Zee
Bu Xiangzhi - Maxime Vachier-Lagrave, Corus International Tournament, Group B, Round 3, Wijk aan Zee
Endgame: Tanya Kosintseva - Saut Atalik, Corus International Tournament, Group B, Round 6, Wijk aan Zee
Ian Nepomniachtchi - Manuel Bosboom, Corus International Tournament, Group C, Round 4, Wijk aan Zee
Parimarjan Negi - Wouter Spoelman, Corus International Tournament, Group C, Round 1, Wijk aan Zee

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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-21-07 03:57 PM
Response to Reply #3
4. Shirov - Radjabov, Corus A, Round 3, Wijk aan Zee
Edited on Sun Jan-21-07 04:01 PM by Jack Rabbit



Teimour Radjabov
Photo: ChessBase.de (Germany)

Alexei Shirov vs. Teimour Radjabov
Corus International Tournament, Group A, Round 3
Wijk aan Zee, January 2007

West India Game: King's Indian Defense (Aronin Opening)


1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. Be2 0-0 6. Nf3 e5 7. 0-0 Nc6 8. d5 Ne7 9. b4

  • It's not unusual in the King's Indian for the center to be locked, White to expand on the queenside and Black to take action on the opposite wing.
  • If 9. Ne1 Nd7 10. Nd3 f5 then:
    • 11. Bd2 Nf6 12. f3 f4 13. c5 g5 then:
      • 14. cxd6 cxd6 15. Nf2 h5 16. h3 Ng6 17. Qc2 Rf7 18. Rfc1 then:
        • 18. -- a6 19. a4 Bf8 20. a5 b5 21. axb6 Qxb6 22. Na4 Qa7 23. Ba5 the center is locked, the queenside is open with White better developed and Black has a spatial edge on the Queen's wing (Sosonko-Fedorowicz, Team Match, Cannes 1992).
        • 18. -- g4? is too loose for Black: 19. fxg4 hxg4 20. hxg4 Ne8 21. Ncd1 Bf6 22. Qb3 Bh4 23. Rc3 give White dominace on the queenside while Black's kingside is disorganized (Kozul-Nataf, IECC, Istanbul 2003).
      • 14. Rc1 Ng6 15. cxd6 cxd6 16. Nb5 Rf7 17. Qc2 Ne8 18. a4 h5 19. Nf2 is approximately equal.
    • 11. exf5 Nxf5 12. f3 Nf6 13. Nf2 Nd4 14. Nfe4 Nh5 15. Bg5 Qd7 16. g3 h6 17. Be3 c5 18. Bxd4 exd4 give White a slight edge in the center; both sides have chances (Gligoric-Fischer, Candidates' Trmt, Bled 1961).
9. -- Nh5 10. Re1 f5 11. Ng5 Nf6 12. f3

  • Following White's queenside expansion, Black has expanded on the King's wing and pressures the center. White moves to resupport his e-pawn.
  • If 12. Bf3 c6 13. Be3 then:
    • 13. -- h6 14. Ne6 Bxe6 15. dxe6 fxe4 16. Nxe4 Nxe4 17. Bxe4 d5 18. cxd5 cxd5 19. Bc2 b6 20. Qg4 e4 21. Rad1 Qc7 22. Bb3 Rad8 draw agreed (Nyback-Radjabov, EU-TCh, Plovdiv 2003).
    • 13. -- Kh8 14. Qb3 h6 15. Ne6 Bxe6 16. dxe6 fxe4 17. Nxe4 Nxe4 18. Bxe4 Qc8 19. b5 Qxe6 20. Rad1 a6 21. bxc6 bxc6 22. Rd2 Rfb8 23. Qd3 d5 is equal and a draw soon agreed (Schandorff-Blehm, ol, Istanbul 2000).
12. -- Kh8

  • If 12. -- c6 then:
    • 13. Be3 Bh6 14. h4 cxd5 15. cxd5 Bd7 16. Qd2 then:
      • 16. -- a6 17. a4 f4 18. Bf2 Bxg5 19. hxg5 Nh5 20. b5 Nc8 21. b6 Qxg5 22. Rec1 Qd8 23. Qe1 Ng3 24. Bxg3 fxg3 gives Black strong possibilities of a kingside attack (Murzin-Kotronias, Anibal Op, Linares 2003).
      • 16. -- f4 17. Bf2 Bxg5 18. hxg5 Nh5 19. Rec1 a6 20. b5 Nc8 21. bxa6 bxa6 22. Rab1 Qxg5 23. Rb7 Rf7 24. Rcb1 Qd8 is level (Xu Jun-Safin, ol, Bled 2002).
    • 13. Kh1 h6 14. Ne6 Bxe6 15. dxe6 Ne8 16. Qb3 Nc7 17. c5 d5 18. exd5 cxd5 19. Bb2 Qe8 20. a4 a6 21. Rad1 Rd8 22. Nxd5 Rxd5 23. Bc4 Rxd1 24. Rxd1 is balanced (van Wely-Stellwagen, Dutch Ch, Leeuwarden 2005 ).
13. Ne6 Bxe6 14. dxe6 Nh5

  • 14. -- fxe4 15. fxe4 Nc6 16. Nd5 Nxe4 17. Bf3 Nf6 18. b5 Nxd5 19. bxc6 Nb6 20. cxb7 Rb8 21. c5 e4 22. Rxe4 dxc5 23. Qxd8 Rfxd8 24. Bg5 Re8 is equal (van Wely-Radjabov, FIDE World Cup, Khanty Mansyisk 2005).
15. g3 Bf6 16. c5 f4 17. Kg2!?

  • White breaks from "theory" and elects to reenforce his kingside pawns.
  • In an ealier round of this tournament, White played 17. g4 which was met by 17. -- Ng7 18. Bc4 Nc6 19. cxd6 cxd6 when:
    • 20. Ne2? Rc8 21. Bd5 Nxb4
      • after 22. Rb1 Nc2 23. Rf1 b6 24. Rb2 Ne3 25. Bxe3 fxe3 Black went on to win (van Wely-Radjabov, Corus IT Rd 1, Wijk aan Zee 2007).
      • 22. Bb3 stops 22. -- Nc2, but after 22. -- Re8 23. Rb1 Qb6+ 24. Kh1 Qa6 25. Bd5 Nxd5 26. exd5 Rc5 Black still wins.
    • Correct is 20. Bb2 Nxb4 21. Rb1 Rc8 22. Bb3 Qb6+ 23. Kg2 giving Black a slight edge with his queenside initiative.
17. -- Nc6!?

  • After this move, White wiil an outpost at d5. It is doubtful that any satisfactory move would have could have prevented that.
  • The positive side of this move is that Black prepares to take advantage of his own outpost at d4.
  • If 17. -- dxc5 18. Qxd8 Raxd8 19. bxc5 Ng7 20. Rb1 b6 21. Bc4 then:
    • After 21. -- Rd4 22. Bb3 bxc5 23. Nb5 Rb4 24. Nxc7 White still gets the outpost at d5.
    • 21. -- bxc5? 22. Nd5
    • 22. Nxd5 23. exd5 c6 dxc6 gives White greater mobility as Black's Rooks are tied to defending against the advancing pawns.
    • After 22. -- c6 23. Nxf6 Rxf6 24. gxf4 White's Rooks have greater freedom.
18. cxd6 cxd6 19. Nd5!?

  • White wastes no time putting his Knight on the outpost, but he does nothing about protecting the pawn at b4. There is nothing White can do to prevent Black from moving his Knight to d4.
  • The move also involves a pawn sacrifice, about which more later.
  • If 19. a3 fxg3 20. hxg3 Nxg3 21. Kxg3 Bh4+ 22. Kg2 Bxe1 23. Qxe1 then:
    • 23. -- Nd4 24. Bh6 Nc2 25. Qc1 Nxa1 26. Bxf8 is equal.
    • 23. -- Re8 24. Qg3 Nd4 25. Bg5 Qc8 26. Rh1 Qxe6 27. Qh4 gives White a stronger initiative.
19. -- Nd4

  • Black accepts the pawn. This will give Black an extra pawn, but it will give White two Bishops against two Knights. In addition, Black's extra pawn will be weak and will require much energy to defend.
  • As SteinitZ said, a pawn is worth a little trouble.
20. Bb2 Nxe6 21. g4 Nhg7

  • Black decides against interposing any tactics before retreating the Knight.
  • If 21. -- Bh4 22. Rf1 Qg5 23. Rc1 Rfd8 24. Nc7 Nxc7 25. Rxc7 Nf6 then:
    • 26. Qa1 Rab8 27. Rfc1 Rd7 White's command of the c-file is balanced by Black's kingside space.
    • 26. Rxb7 d5 27. exd5 Rxd5 28. Qc2 Rad8 Black's kingside pieces are stuck on each other, but White does not have a good way to exploit the situation.
22. Nxf6 Rxf6 23. Qd5?!

  • Putting the Queen in the outpost is probably not the best approach.
  • If 23.Bc4 Rf7 24.Rc1 Rc7 then:
    • After 25.Qb3 Qe7 26.Bd5 Rac8 27.Rxc7 Rxc7 28.Rd1 b5 29.Rd2 White's two Bishops balance Black's extra pawn.
    • After 25.Qd3 Rac8 26.Red1 Qf6 27.Bxe6 Qxe6 White will restore the material balance by taking the pawn at d6.
  • Else if 23. Rc1 h5 24. h3 Rf7 25. Rg1 Qh4 26. Qe1 then:
    • 26. -- Qg5 27. Qf2 Rc7 28. Rxc7 Nxc7 29. Rd1 Nge8 is again a situation where White's Bishops balance White's extra pawn.
    • 26. -- Qxe1 27. Rgxe1 Rc7 28. Rxc7 Nxc7 29. Rd1 is equal.
23. -- Qe7 24. Red1 Rd8 25. Qa5!?

  • This move does nothing except force Black to weaken a square (c6) that White has no immediate prospects of exploiting.
  • However, no better is 25. Rac1 Rf7 26. a4 Qg5 27. Rc3 h5 28. Kh1 hxg4 29. fxg4 Qh4 when Black's accumulated advantages -- a protected passed pawn and an extra pawn -- give him a slight overall edge. White still has better mobility.
25. -- b6 26. Qd5 Rff8 27. Rac1 h5

  • Black wisely strikes on the kingside, where he has spactial superiority.
  • If 27. -- Rc8? 28. Qxd6 Qxd6 29. Rxd6 Rxc1 30. Bxc1 Rc8 then:
    • 31. Bb2! Nd4 32. Bxd4 exd4 33. Rxd4 gives White an extra pawn and ties the Black Rook down to the defense of the back rank for the time being.
    • 31. Bd2? Rc2 32. a4 +/=
28. gxh5 Qh4

  • Black continues his kingside attack.
  • The game has reached a sharp position where any inexact move could cause things to go wrong in a hurry.
  • 28. -- gxh5 29. Kh1 Rc8 30. a4 Rxc1 31. Rxc1 Rg8 32. Bc4 maintains the balance.
29. Rc6 g5 30. Rxd6 g4 31. Rxe6?

  • The sacrifice of the Queen works out badly for Black.
  • Correct is 31. Qxe5 Qh3+ 32. Kg1 gxf3 33. Qxg7+ Nxg7 34. Rh6+ Kg8 35. Bc4+ Ne6 36. Rh8+ Kf7 37. Rh7+ when:
    • 37. -- Kg8! 38. Rh8+ draws by repetition.
    • After 37. -- Ke8? 38. Bb5+ Rd7 39. Bxd7+ Kd8 40. Bxe6+ White wins.


Black: Teimour Radjabov
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White: Alexei Shirov
Position after 31. Rd6e6:N

31. -- Rxd5!

  • Of course, the best way to refute a sacrifice is to accept it (Steinitz said that, too). There is definitely no reason to decline this one.
  • On the other hand, Black would be no worse off if he declined the poffered Queen: if 31. -- gxf3+ 32. Kh1 Kh7 33. Bd3 f2 then:
    • After
    • 34. Re7 Qxe7 35. Qxe5 Qxe5 36. Bxe5 Rxd3 37. Rf1 f3 Black is a Rook to the good.
    • After 34. Rg6 Rxd5 35. exd5 Nf5 36. Rf1 Qh3 37. Bxf5 Qxf5 38. Rxf2 Qe4+ White's uncoordinated pieces are no match for the mobility of Black's Queen.
32. Rh6+ Kg8 33. Bc4 gxf3+ 34. Kh1

  • After 34. Kxf3 Qh3+ 35. Kf2 Qe3+ 36. Kg2 Qxe4+ 37. Kg1 Qxc4 White has no compensation for the Queen whatsoever.
34. -- Nxh5 35. Rg1+

  • 35. Bxd5 Kg7 Rxh5 Qxh5 37. Rg1+ Kf6 leaves White with only two minor pieces for the Queen.
35. --Ng3+

  • 35. -- Kf7? lets White off the hook: 36. Bxd5+ Ke8 37. Re6+ Kd7 38. Bxe5 Re8 is equal.
36. Rxg3+ fxg3 37. Rxh4

  • On the surface, it appears that White will get a Rook and a minor piece for the Queen and emerge with a winning attack.
  • Appearances are deceiving.
37. -- g2+! 38. Kg1

Black: Teimour Radjabov
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White: Alexei Shirov
Position after 38. Kh1g1

38. -- f2+!!

  • Black sacrifices two pawns in order to free his Rook from the pin.
  • Any other move loses the Rook and the game.
  • The following moves are all forced.
39. Kxg2 f1Q+ 40. Bxf1 Rd2+ 41. Kg3

  • Black has emerged from the double-pawn sacrifice an exchange up and with a clear advantage. He now squeezes the life out of White's position.
  • 41. Kg1 Rxb2 42. Rh5 Rb1 43. Rf5 Rxf5 44. exf5 Rxb4 is clearly hopeless for White.
41. -- Rxb2 42. Bc4+ Kg7 43. Bb3

  • If 43. Rh5 Rxb4 44. Bd5 Rb1 then:
    • 45. Rxe5 Rg1+ 46. Kh4 Rh8+ 47. Rh5 Rh1 48. Rxh8 Rxh2+ is lights out.
    • 45. Rg5+ Kf6 46. Rf5+ Kg7 47. Rxe5 reaches the same position.
43. -- Rb1 44. Kg2 Rc8 45. Kf3

  • If 45. Rh5 Rc3 46. Rg5+ Kh6 then:
    • After 47. Rg3 Rb2+ 48. Kh3 Rc1 49. Rg2 Rxg2 50. Kxg2 Kg5 Black plays his King to f4 and his Rook to the b-file, winning a pawn.
    • 47. Rxe5 Rb2+ 48. Bc2 (forced) 48. -- Rbxc2+ -+
45. -- Rc3+ 46. Kg4 Rf1 47. Kh5 Kf6 48. 0-1

  • 48. Rg4 Rh3+ 49. Rh4 Rxh4+ 50. Kxh4 Rf4+ -+
  • 48. Bg8 Rg1 49. Bh7 Rc7 50. Kh6 Rgg7 -+
  • El seor Shirov resigns.

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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-21-07 04:05 PM
Response to Reply #3
5. Molytov - Anand, Corus A, Round 2, Wijk aan Zee



Vishy Anand
Photo: website of the 2006 Tal Memorial Tournament


Alexander Molytov vs. Vishy Anand
Corus International Tournament, Group A, Round 2
Wijk aan Zee, January 2007

Open Sicilian Game: Najdorf-Scheveningen Defense (Rauzer Attack/Poisoned Pawn Variation)


1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Bg5 e6 7. f4 Qb6 8. Qd2 Qxb2

  • The Poisoned Pawn variation was a favorite weapon of Bobby Fischer's.
9. Rb1 Qa3 10. e5

  • If 10. f5 Nc6 11. fxe6 fxe6 12. Nxc6 bxc6 13. e5
    • 13. -- dxe5 14. Bxf6 gxf6 15. Ne4
      • 15. -- Qxa2 16. Rd1 Be7 17. Be2 0-0 18. 0-0
        • 18. -- Ra7 19. Rf3 Kh8 20. Rg3 Rd7 21. Qh6 Rf7 22. Qh5 Rxd1+ 23. Bxd1 Qa5 24. Kf1 Qd8 25. Qxf7 Qxd1+ 26. Kf2 Qxc2+ 27. Kf3 Qd1+ is equal (Vallejo-Kasparov, Team Match, Moscow 2004).
        • 18. -- f5 19. Qh6 Qxc2 20. Rd3 Qxe2 21. Rg3+ Kf7 22. Rxf5+ exf5 23. Rg7+ Ke8 24. Qxc6+ Kd8 25. Qb6+ Ke8 26. Qc6+ Kd8 draw agreed (Velimirovic-Ftacnik, Vrsac 1981).
      • 15. -- Be7 16. Be2 h5 17. Rb3 Qa4 18. Nxf6+ Bxf6 19. c4 Ra7 20. 0-0
        • 20. -- Rd7 21. Qe3 Qxa2 22. Rxf6 Qa1+ 23. Bf1
          • 23. -- Rg7 24. Rb8 Ke7 25. Rf2 Qd4 26. Qf3 e4 gives Black the initiative (Beliavsky-Timman, IT, Tilburg 1987).
          • 23. -- Qd4 24. Rxe6+ Kd8 25. Rxc6 Rf8 26. Qxd4 Rxd4 27. Be2 h4 is level (Timman-Hjartarson, IT, Linares 1989).
        • 20. -- Rf7
          • 21. Qd6! Be7 22. Qxe5 Rxf1+ 23. Kxf1 0-0+ 24. Kg1 h4 25. Qh5 Qxa2 26. Qg6+ Kh8 draw agreed (Bouaziz-Tukmakov, Interzonal, Las Palmas 1982).
          • after 21. Rbf3 Rd7 22. Qb2 Rb7 23. Rb3 0-0 24. Rxb7 Bxb7 25. Qxb7 Qxa2 26. Bxh5 e4 Black's mating threat will net at least a pawn (Velimirovic-Nunn, Skara 1980).
    • 13. -- Nd5 14. Nxd5 cxd5 15. Be2 dxe5 16. 0-0 Ra7 17. c4 Qc5+ 18. Kh1 d4 19. Bh5+ g6 20. Bd1 Be7 21. Ba4+ Kd8 22. Rf7 h6 23. Bxh6 e4 24. h3 e5 25. Bg5 e3 26. Bxe3 Rh5 is equal (Timman-Sunye, IT, Wijk aan Zee 1980).
10. -- h6

  • If 10. -- dxe5 11. fxe5 Nfd7 12. Bc4 Bb4 13. Rb3 Qa5 14. 0-0 0-0 then:
    • 15. Bf6 Nxf6 16. exf6 Rd8 17. Rxb4 Qxb4 18. Qg5 g6 19. Rf4 Qf8 20. Rh4 b5 21. Bd3 b4 22. Bxg6 hxg6 23. Rh6 Rxd4 24. Rxg6+ draw agreed iHartston-Mecking, IT, 1967). The game would have continued 24. -- fxg6 25. Qxg6+ Kh8 26. Qh5+ Kg8 with a repetion.
    • 15. Nxe6 fxe6 16. Bxe6+ Kh8 17. Rxf8+ Bxf8 18. Qf4 Nc6 19. Qf7 Qc5+ 20. Kh1 Nf6 21. Bxc8 Nxe5 22. Qe6 Neg4 White resigns as he is down one minor piece and must lose another (Tringov-Fischer, Capablanca mem, Havana 1965).
11. Bh4?

  • 11. Bxf6 gxf6 12. Ne4 fxe5 13. Rb3 Qa4 14. fxe5 dxe5 15. Nf6+ Ke7 16. Nf5+ exf5 17. Nd5+ Ke6 18. Nc7+ Ke7 draw agreed (Lugovoi-Yemelin, City Ch, St. Petersburg 2001).
11. -- dxe5 12. fxe5 Nfd7 13. Ne4

  • White sacrifices a second pawn (the first being the "poisoned" b-pawn) in an attempt to dominate the center.
  • If 13. Be2 Be7 then:
    • 14. Bg3 14. -- Bg5 15. Qd3 Nc5 16. Qf3 0-0 17. h4 Bd8 18. 0-0 Nbd7 19. Kh1
      • After 19. -- b5 20. Rb3 Nxb3 21. axb3 Ra7 22. Ne4 Bb7 Black has the initiative while White is tied up in knots (Matanovic-Minic, Yugoslav Ch, Kragujevac 1959).
      • 19. -- Rb8 20. Bf4 Bc7 21. Qg3 Kh8 22. Rf3 Qa5 23. Re3 Kh7 24. Rf1 Qb4 gives Black and extra pawn and a strong initiative (Pichler-Yuferov, Goldberg mem, Moscow 1990).
    • After 14. 0-0 Bxh4 15. Rxf7 Kxf7 16. Bh5+ Kg8 17. Nxe6 Nf8 18. Nxf8 Qc5+ 19. Kh1 Qxf8 20. Qd5+ Black soon won (Pyhala-Valkesalmi, Jarvenpaa 1985).


Black: Alexander Molytov
!""""""""#
$t+v+l+ T%
$+o+m+o+ %
$o+mPo+ O%
$+ +w+ O %
$ + N + +%
$+ + + B %
$ +pQ +pP%
$+ +rKv+r%
/(((((((()

White: Vishy Anand
Position after 13. Nc3e4

13. -- Qxa2!

  • All roads to victory pass through this move.
  • If 13. -- g5 14. Bg3 then:
    • 14. -- b6? 15. c3! Bb7 Bd3 Be7 17. 0-0 Nc5 still gives Black the edge, but not a decisive one.
    • Correct is 14. -- Qxa2! (as in the actual game) 15. Rd1 Qd5 16. Nd6+ Bxd6 exd6 Nc6 giving Black two extra pawns.
14. Rd1

  • This move, in hopes of generating some active play on the d-file, involves the sacrifice of a third pawn (the e-pawn). At this point, White has nothing to lose.
  • If 14. Rb3 Qa1+ 15. Kf2 Qa4 then:
    • 16. Rc3 Nc6 17. Rc4 Qa5 18. Qxa5 Nxa5 19. Rc7 Nxe5 wins the third pawn anyway.
    • After 16. Nd6+ Bxd6 17. exd6 Nc6 18. Ke3 Nc5 19. Rb1 e5 Black frees his Bishop,
14. -- Qd5 15. Qe3 Qxe5 16. Be2 Bc5 17. Bg3

  • If 17. 0-0 Nc6 18. c3 0-0 19. Bg3 Qd5 20. Bf3 e5 then:
    • 21. Nxc5 Qxc5 22. Nf5 Qxe3+ 23. Nxe3 f6 White still has nothing to show for being three pawns down.
    • 21. Nf6+ Nxf6 22. Bxd5 Nxd5 23. Qf3 Nxc3 24. Qxc3 Bxd4+ 25. Rxd4 exd4 give Black a fourth extra pawn.
17. -- Bxd4 18. Rxd4 Qa5+ 19. Rd2 0-0 20. Bd6

  • Quite naturally, Black finds a hole and occupies it with a piece. Unfortunately, there is nothing to exploit.
  • 20. 0-0 Nc6 21. Nd6 Qc5 22. Qxc5 Nxc5 23. Bf3 Rd8 pins the Knight to a hanging Rook.
20. -- Rd8 21. Qg3 Qf5

  • If 21. -- Re8 22. 0-0 Nc6 23. Bc7 Qb4 then:
    • After 24. Rxf7 Kxf7 25. Nd6+ Kg8 26. Nxe8 Qe7 Black begins to drive White's minor pieces away.
    • if 24. c4 Ne7 then:
      • 25. Rxd7 Bxd7 gives Black the exchange.
      • Black wins the exchange after 25. Rd4 Nf5.
22. Be5 Qg6

  • 22. -- Nxe5? would cost Black: 23. Rxd8+ Kh7 24. Nd6 Nf3+ 25. Kf2 Qc5+ 26. Kxf3 Qd5+ 27. Ke3 Qc5+ draws by repetition.
23. Qh4

  • White at least has enough in his position for short spurts of initiative. Black must take time out from his plans and respond to the attack on the hanging Rook.
  • 23. Qxg6 fxg6 24. Bg4 Nc6 25. Bxe6+ Kh7 26. Bb2 Re8 27. Bxd7 Rxe4+ White remains three pawns up and finally has an opportunity to either develop or exchange his listless Bishop.
23. -- Nc6 24. 0-0

  • If 24. Bc7 Rf8 25. Bh5 Qh7 26. Bd6 g5 27. Nxg5 hxg5 28. Qxg5+ Qg7 29. Qxg7+ Kxg7 -+
  • 27. Qg4 f5 28. Nxg5 Qg7 29. Nxe6 fxg4 30. Nxg7 Kxg7 -+
24. -- f5?

  • This should have cost Black the vicotry. It opens the f-file and allows White to use a complex of weak squares to threaten the Black King by which he almost gains a draw.
  • Correct is 24. -- f6 25. Bc7 Rf8 26. Nd6 Nde5 27. c4 Qh7 28. Bb6 Ne7 when Black is three pawns to the good.
25. Bh5 Qh7 26. Bb2

  • Black rightly keeps his Bishop aimed at g7.
  • Black begins to recover after 26. Qg3?! fxe4 27. Bg6 when:
    • 17. -- Ncxe5 28. Bxh7+ Kxh7 29. Rd6 Ng6 30. Rf7 Rf8 31. Rfxd7 Bxd7 32. Rxd7 Rac8 Black command of open files and extra pawns again give him a strong advantage.
    • Black stands better after 27. -- Qxg6 28. Qxg6 Ncxe5 29. Qxe6+ Kh7 30. Qe7 Rg8 but still needs to free his Bishop.
26. -- fxe4 27. Rf7 Rf8!?

  • Black could force a draw here, but he'd rather see if slip up in complications.
  • If 27. -- e5 28. Bxe5 then:
    • 28. -- Rf8 29. Rxg7+ Qxg7 30. Bxg7 Kxg7 31. Qg4+ Kh8 32. Qg6 Rf6 33. Qe8+ Rf8 draws by repetition.
    • After 28. -- Nf6? 29. Rxd8+ Nxd8 30. Rxf6 gxf6 31. Qxf6 Bf5 32. g4 e3 33. gxf5 e2 34. Kf2 White soon delivers mate.
28. Qf2?

  • White misses his last chance to salvage a half point.
  • Correct is 28. Rxg7+ Qxg7 29. Bxg7 Kxg7 30. Qg3+ Kh8 31. Qg6 Rf6 32. Qe8+ Rf8 33. Qg6 Rf6 drawing by repetition.
28. -- Rxf7 29. Qxf7+ Kh8 30. Rf2

  • After 30. Rxd7 Bxd7 31. Qxd7 e5 Black wins much as in the text.


Black: Alexander Molytov
!""""""""#
$t+v+ + L%
$+o+m+qOW%
$o+m+o+ O%
$+ + + +v%
$ + +o+ +%
$+ + + + %
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/(((((((()

White: Vishy Anand
Position after 30. Rd2f2

30. -- e5!

  • Black puts an end to any hope White might have entertained of getting any counterplay.
  • Molytov could have resigned here as easily as he did after the next move.
31. Qd5 Nf6 32. 0-1
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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-21-07 04:09 PM
Response to Reply #3
6. Bu Xiangzhi - Vachier-Lagrave, Round 3, Corus B, Wijk aan Zee



Bu Xiangzhi
Photo: ChessBase.de (Germany)

Bu Xiangzhi vs. Maxime Vachier-Lagrave
Corus International Tournament Group B, Round 3
Wijk aan Zee, January 2007

Queen's English Game: Anglo-Grnfeld Opening


1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. Qa4+

  • 5. Qb3 Nb6 6. d4 Bg7 7. Bf4 Be6 reaches the text position after 8 moves of the present game a move sooner
  • 5. e4 Nxc3 6. dxc3 Qxd1+ 7. Kxd1 f6 8. Be3 e5 9. Nd2 Be6 10. Bc4 Kf7 11. Kc2 Nd7 12. Rhd1 Be7 13. a4 Rhd8 14. b4 a5 gives Black a slight initiative (Suba-Svidler, IT, Linares 1994).
5. -- Bd7 6. Qb3 Nb6 7. d4 Bg7 8. Bf4

  • 8. Bg5 Be6 9. Qc2 Nc6 10. Rd1 h6 11. Bh4 0-0 12. e3 Nb4 13. Qb1 Bf5 14. e4 Bg4 15. d5 Bxf3 16. gxf3 Qd7 17. a3 Na6 18. Qc2 Rfe8 19. Bg3 c6 20. d6 Nc5 21. dxe7 Qxe7 yields an equal game (Savchenko-McShane, Bundesliga, Hofheim 2005).
8. -- Be6 9. Qa3

  • If 9. Qc2 Nc6 then:
    • 10. e3 0-0 11. Be2 Nb4 12. Qd1 c5 13. 0-0 Rc8
      • 14. a3 14. -- N4d5 15. Nxd5 Bxd5 16. dxc5 Rxc5 17. Rc1 Qc8 18. Qd2 Nc4 19. Bxc4 Bxc4 20. Rfd1 Bb3 21. Rxc5 Qxc5 22. Rc1 Qd5 23. Qxd5 Bxd5 24. Be5
        • 24. -- f6 25. Bd4 a6 26. Rc7 e5 27. Bc3 Rf7 28. Rc8+ Rf8 29. Rc7 Rf7 30. Rc8+ draw agreed (Gausel-Jansa, Oslo 1991).
        • 24. -- Rd8 25. Bxg7 Kxg7 26. Rd1 Rd6 27. Nd4 a6 28. Ne2 is a drawish-looking ending.
      • 14. Be5 Bxe5 15. Nxe5 cxd4 16. exd4 Nc6 17. Nxc6 Rxc6 18. Bf3 Nd5 19. Bxd5 Bxd5 20. Re1 e6 21. Qd2 Rd6 allows Black to use White's isolated pawn to his advantage (Padevsky-Hort, Monaco 1968).
    • 10. e4 Nb4 11. Qb1 0-0 12. a3 Na6 13. d5 Bd7 14. Be5 e6 15. Bxg7 Kxg7 16. Bxa6 bxa6 17. 0-0 exd5 18. exd5 Rb8 19. Qd3 Qf6 20. Rfd1 is equal (Speelman-Peek, Dutch TCh, Holland 1995).
9. -- Nc6!?

  • Black tries developing his Knight to see if that would give him any better prospects than previous game that reached this position.
  • 9. -- 0-0 10. e3 Nd5 11. Nxd5 Bxd5 12. Be2 Nd7 13. 0-0 c6 14. Bg3 Nf6 15. Be5 Ne4 16. Bxg7 Kxg7 17. Rfd1 h5 18. Ne5 Qd6 19. Qd3 White has more space and the Good Bishop (Wang Yue-Areschenko, Young Masters', Lausanne 2006).
10. e3

  • White prefers to fortify his d-pawn rather than create a pawn duo in the center.
  • If 10. e4 Nxd4 11. Nxd4 Qxd4 12. Rd1 Qf6 13. Bxc7 then:
    • 13. -- 0-0 14. e5 Qf4 15. Qxe7 Nd5 16. Nxd5 Bxd5 gives Black an edge in that the King is stuck in the center.
    • 13. -- Bd7 14. Bxb6 Qxb6 15. Nd5 gives White the better center; each player needs to bring his King to safety, which is easier for Black than White here.
10. -- 0-0 11. Be2 a5 12. Qc5 a4 13. Nb5 Ra5!?

  • Black makes a risky move hoping to entrap White in complications. White threatens the pawn at c7; Black protects the pawn tactically.
  • Safer, but passive, is 13. -- Nd5 14. Bg3 Bg4 15. 0-0 Ra5 16. Qc4 Qd7 yielding a level game.
14. Qc1 Nd5 15. Bg3 Bg4 16. Qc4 Be6?!

  • Black again tries to complicate the game with a masked attack on White's Queen.
  • Better might be the more direct 16. -- Nb6 17. Qc5 Qd7 18. 0-0 Bxf3 19. gxf3 e5 when:
    • 20. Bxe5 Bxe5 21. dxe5 Qd2 gives Black better piece activity.
    • 20. b4 axb3 21. axb3 Rxa1 22. Rxa1 exd4 23. Rd1 gives Black the edge with his ability to open the diagonal for his Bishop after an exchange of Queens.
17. Ng5 Bf5 18. 0-0 e5 19. Nf3

  • The position on the board is equal.
  • If 19. dxe5 a3 20. e4 then:
    • 20. -- Nb6 21. Qc1 Bg4 Rxb5 23. bxa3 Nxe5 24. Be2 Rb2 is balanced (if 25. Qxb2? then 25. -- Nf3+! wins the Queen).
    • 20. -- axb2 21. Rad1 Qxg5 22. exf5 Nb6 23. Qb3 Qxf5 24. Nxc7 is slightly better for White.
19. -- Be6 20. Qc2 exd4

  • If 20. -- Ncb4? 21. Qd2 then:
    • 21. -- e4 22. Ne1 Nc6 23. Rc1 Ra8 24. Bc4 Na5 25. Bxd5 Qxd5 26. Nxc7 Qxa2 27. Rc2 leaves Black's Queen with a cumbersome exit route.
    • 21. -- c6 22. a3 e4 23. Ne1 Rxb5 24. Bxb5 cxb5 25. axb4 gives White a great deal more freedom as Black's queenside pawns and completely restained.
21. Nbxd4 Nxd4 22. Nxd4 Bd7

  • 22. -- Bxd4 23. exd4 c6 24. Qd2 Ne7 25. Qb4 b6 26. Bf3 Bd5 27. Rfe1 Nf5 is level.
23. Rad1 c6 24. Nb5 Qf6 25. Nd6 Qxb2

  • 25. -- Ra7 26. Rd2 a3 27. b3 Nc3 28. Bf3 give White significantly better piece activity.
26. Qxb2 Bxb2 27. Nxb7 Ra7 28. Nc5 Nc3 29. Rd2 a3?!

  • If 29. -- Ba3! 30. Nxd7 Nxe2+ then:
    • 31. Kh1 Nxg3+ 32. hxg3 Rc8 33. Rfd1 Kg7 is balanced.
    • 31. Rxe2 Rxd7 32. Rc2 c5 33. Rb1 Rfd8 34. Kf1 is equal.
30. Bc4 Bf5 31. f3 Ra5 32. Bd6 Re8 33. e4 Bc8 34. Nd3 Nb5?!

  • If 34. -- Ra4! 35. Bb3 Rd4 36. Bc5 Rd7 then:
    • 37. Be3 Ba6 38. Nxb2 Rxd2 39. Bxd2 Bxf1 40. Bxc3 axb2 41. Bxb2 gives Black the advantage of the exchange.
    • 37. Bc4 Na4 38. Bb4 Nb6 39. Bb3 gives White better mobility.
35. Bxb5 Rxb5 36. Nxb2 axb2 37. Rb1 Rd8 38. a4 Ra5

  • After 38. -- Rb6 39. e5 Ra6 40. Rd4 Rb6 41. Rb4 Rxb4 42. Bxb4 Black cannot save his b-pawn and White's a-pawn is more mobile than Black's c-pawn.
39. Rbxb2 Be6?

  • Black apparently believes that he can gain some advantage by giving up the exchange.
  • Correct is 39. -- Rxa4 40. Kf2 f6 41. Rbc2 Ra6 42. Ke3 Kf7 43. f4 when White is slightly better in cental/kingside space; piece activity is a standoff.
40. Bc7

  • This is a Bishop fork.
  • 40. Rb6 c5 41. Bc7 Rxd2 42. Rb8+ Kg7 43. Bxa5 Rc2 44. Bb6 gives White more piece activity.
40. -- Rxd2

  • If 40. -- Rda8 41. Bxa5 Rxa5 then:
    • 42. Rb6 c5 43. Rb5 Rxa4 44. Rxc5 Kg7 45. g4 gives White exchange and an extra pawn.
    • 42. Rdc2 Rxa4 43. Rxc6 Kg7 44. Kf2 h5 45. h4 yields the same material result.


Black: Maxime Vachier-Lagrave
!""""""""#
$ + + +l+%
$+ B +o+o%
$ +o+ +o+%
$T + + + %
$p+ +p+ +%
$+ + +p+ %
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$+ + + K %
/(((((((()

White: Bu Xiangzhi
Position after 40. -- Rd8d2:R

41. Rb8+!!

  • This is probably what Black missed when he played 39. -- Be6.
  • By not retaking the Rook, White delivers the knockout blow.
  • 41. Rxd2? Rxa4 42. Be5 Kf8 43. Bf6 Ra8 44. Rb2 is insufficient for a win.
41. -- Kg7 42. Bxa5 Ra2

  • If 42. -- Rc2 43. Bb62 then:
    • 43. -- Kf6 44. a5 Ra2 45. Ra8 Bc4 46. Rc8 Bb5 47. h4 retrains the King from moving forward.
    • 43. -- Ra2 44. a5 h5 45. Bd4+ f6 46. Rb7+ Kg8 47. Bxf6 gives White an edge of two pawns.
43. Bc3+ Kh6 44. Bf6 Rxa4 45. g4 Bxg4

  • 45. -- Ra2 46. g5+ Kh5 47. Rh8 Kh4 48. Rxh7#
46. fxg4 Rxe4 47. h3 Re6

  • 47. -- Rf4 48. g5+ Kh5 49. Rh8 threatens a quick and merciful mate.
48. g5+ Kh5 49. Rh8 Kh4

  • 49. -- Rxf6 stops the threatened mate at the cost of a Rook.
  • 49. -- Re1+ only delays the inevitable.
50. Kg2 h5 51. gxh6+ Kh5 52. h7 1-0

  • 52. -- Rxf6 53. Ra8 Kg5 54. h8Q Re6 55. Ra5+ Kf4 56. Qd4+ Re4 57. Qf2#
  • 52. -- Kh6 53. Ra8 Kxh7 54. Rh8#
  • M. Vachier-Lagrave resigns.

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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-21-07 04:10 PM
Response to Reply #3
7. Endgame: T. Kosintseva - Atalik, Corus B, Round 6, Wijk aan Zee
Edited on Sun Jan-21-07 04:42 PM by Jack Rabbit



Tanya Kosintseva
Photo: ChessBase.com

Tanya Kosintseva vs. Saut Atalik
Corus International Tournament, Group B, Round 6
Wijk aan Zee, January 2007


Black: Saut Atalik
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White: Tanya Kosintseva
Position after Black's 24th move

25. Be2!!

  • This move is key to White's regrouping of her pieces.
25. -- Re5 26. Bf3 Ke7 27. Rd3 Nd7

  • The e-pawn is now unassailable; Black reposts his Knight.
  • If 27. -- Bc4 28. Rd2 Be6 29. Bc3 then:
    • 29. -- Rxc3 30. bxc3 b5 31. Red1 then:
      • 31. -- Nxe4 32. Bxe4 Rxe4 33. Rxd6 give White the exchange and command of the d-file.
      • 31. -- Ne8 32. Kc1 a5 33. Rd4 gives White the exchange and a solid center.
    • 29. -- Rb5 30. a4 Rbc5 31. e5 Nd5 32. exd6+ Rxd6 33. Bxg7 gives White an extra pawn.
28. Red1 Nc5 29. Re3 Rc8 30. Bc3!

  • Again White dirsupts Black's position by ticklling the vulnerable Rook.
  • 30. Be1 Rh8 31. Bc3 Rg5 32. e5 d5 33. Bb4 b6 gives White only a slight edge with better piece activity.
30. -- Rg5 31. e5 d5 32. Be1!

  • This was the point of White's 25th move, the vacate e1 for the Bishop, which attacks the h-pawn.
32. -- Rg6

  • This leaves the h-pawn hanging; the Rook has very little scope at g6.
  • Better is 32. -- Rh8 33. Bxd5 Bxd5 34. Rxd5 b6.
33. Bxh4+

  • White wastes no time in taking a free pawn.
33. -- Ke8 34. Bxd5 Bxd5 35. Rxd5 Rxg2 36. Rc3

  • White continues to play actively pinning the Knight. The move demands an immediate response.
  • 36. Rg3?! Rxg3 37. Bxg3 Ke7 38. Rd4 b5 39. Rg4 Ne6 gives White slightly better piece activity to go with her extra pawn.
36. -- g5

  • Black chooses to defend actively.
  • If 36. -- b6 (a passive defense) 37. b4 g5 38. bxc5 gxh4 39. cxb6 then:
    • 39. -- Rb8 40. Rb3 Rg6 41. b7 Ke7 42. Rc5 Kd7 43. Rc4 White is two pawns up and Black's defenses are stretched thin.
    • After 39. -- Rxc3 40. b7! the pawn will coronate.
37. Bxg5

  • This is a second pawn that White has won permanently.
  • After 37. Rdxc5 Rxc5 38. Rxc5 gxh4 39. Rc4 Re2 40. Rxh4 Rxe5 41. Rh8+ Ke7 42. h4 White is a pawn ahead and a danerous pawn at that.
37. -- Rxg5 38. Rcxc5 Rxc5 39. Rxc5 f6

  • After 39. -- Rh5 40. Rc8+ Kd7 41. Rg8 Rxe5 42. Rh8 Re1+ 43. Ka2 Re8 44. Rh7 Re7 45. h4 the pawn keep coming forward.
  • 39. -- Kd8 40. Rd5+ Ke8 41. c4 Rh5 42. e6 Rxh3 43. exf7+ Kxf7 44. Rd7+ wins another pawn.


  • Black: Saut Atalik
    !""""""""#
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    White: Tanya Kosintseva
    Position after 39. -- f7f6

40. Rc7!

  • This is the most active move. White both confines the King to the back rank and attacks the b-pawn.
  • 40. Rc8+?! Kd7 41. Rb8 Kc7 42. Rh8 Rxe5 43. Kc1 f5 44. h4 gives White a strong advantage with the extra pawn and in needing less time to promote her passed pawn.
40. -- Rg1+

  • The check gains time to get the Rook behind the h-pawn.
  • If 40. -- fxe5 41. Rxb7 Rh5 42. Rb3 Ke7 43. Re3 then:
    • 43. -- Ke6 44. Kc1 Rh4 45. Kd2 Kf5 46. b3 e4 47. c4 shows the power of White material edge.
    • After 43. -- Kf6 44. c4 Kf5 45. Kc2 e4 46. b4 Rg5 47. c5 White is up by three pawns; it will be very difficult for Black to stop all of them.
  • 40. -- Rxe5 41. Rxb7 Rh5 42. Rb6 Ke7 43. Rxa6 Rxh3 44. a4 f5 45. Ra7+ Ke6 46. a5 White's a-pawn is dangerous; the b-pawn will soon advance to lend assistance along the road.
41. Ka2 fxe5 42. Rxb7 e4

  • Black's hope rest in the fact that his e-pawn is passed and far more advanced than any of White's pawn.
  • If 42. -- Rg3 then:
    • 43. h4 43. -- Rh3 44. Ra7 Rxh4 45. Rxa6 Ke7 46. Kb3 Rh2 47. Rg6 e4 48. Rg4 Re2 49. a4 Black will sooner or later be forced to abandon his passed pawn to prevent White from promoting. Were the Black Rook behind the pawn instead of in front of it, his chances would be much better.
    • 43. Ra7 Rxh3 44. Rxa6 Ke7 45. Ra5 Ke6 46. Ra8 e4 47. Re8+ then:
      • After 45. -- Kd5 48. a4 e3 49. Kb3 e2+ 50. c3 Rh2 51. a5 Kc5 52. a6 Kb6 53. Re6+ Ka7 54. c4 e1Q 55. Rxe1 Kxa6 56. Kc3 Rh3+ 37. Kb4 the c-pawn will be escorted to Scone.
      • After 47. -- Kf5 48. a4 Kf4 49. a5 Kf3 50. b4 Rh7 51. b5 e3 52. a6 e2 53. b6 Rh8 54. Re6 Rh6 55. a7 the pawn will promote.
43. Rb4 Re1 44. Kb3 a5 45. Rb5 Kd7

  • It is best to play the King to the side of the enemy pawn mass.
  • If 45. -- Re3+ 46. Kc4 Rxh3 then:
    • After 47. Rxa5 47. -- Rh2 48. Re5+ Kd7 49. Rxe4 Rxc2+ 50. Kb3 the a-pawn begins its journey.
    • 47. Kd4 Rh2 48. Rxa5 Rxc2 49. Kxe4 Rxb2 50. Ra7 Rd2 White should win, but Black has cut off the King and can make a fight of it.
46. Rxa5 Kd6 47. Kc3 Rd1 48. Ra8

  • White plays the Rook to the back rank in order to get behind the e-pawn.
  • If 48. Ra4 Ke5 49. Ra8 Kf4 50. Rf8+ then:
    • After 50. -- Ke3 51. a4 Rd7 52. b4 Rc7+ 53. Kb3 Rh7 54. a5 the pawns shuffle forward.
    • After 50. -- Kg3 51. Rg8+ Kxh3 52. Re8 Re1 53. Kd2 Rb1 54. b3 Black's last pawn must fall.
48. -- Ke5 49. b4 e3 50. b5 Kf4 51. Re8 Kf3

  • The Black King is now in his ideal escort square.
  • After 51. -- Rb1 52. a4 Kf3 53. a5 e2 54. a6 e1Q+ 55. Rxe1 Rxe1 56. b6 Rb1 57. a7 the pawn will promite.
52. a4 Ra1

  • Black seeks to restrain White's pawns from behind, which is the ideal way to do it.
  • After 52. -- e2 53. a5 e1Q+ 54. Rxe1 Rxe1 55. b6 Rb1 56. Kd4 Kg3 57. Kc5 there will be no way to stop the pawn.


  • Black: Saut Atalik
    !""""""""#
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    White: Tanya Kosintseva
    Position after 52. -- Rd1a1

53. Kb4!!

  • 53. b6? throws away the win: 53. -- e2 54. b7 Rb1 55. Kd3 Rd1+ is equal.
  • The text move allows Black to promote and sacrices her Rook, but obtains a book win.
53. -- e2 54. a5 e1Q+ 55. Rxe1 Rxe1 56. a6!

  • Two connected passed pawns (against a Rook), in the absence of Kings, win if they are both on the sixth rank, but otherwise lose. If the enemy King can reach any in front of the pawns, the game is a win (for the Rook). -- Reuben Fine, Basic Chess Endings.
  • The fact that one of the pawns is only on the fifth rank is mitigated by the fact that the White King is not absent, but is already on escort duty. Black's King, on the other hand, is absent from the scene.
  • If Black were now to play 56. -- Re8, then the continuation would be 57. a7 Rd8 58. b6 Ra8 59. Kb5 Ke3 60. Ka6 Rf8 61. b7 and when Black runs out of checks, a pawn promotes.
56. -- Ra1 57. Kc5 1-0

  • If 57. -- Kg2 58. Kb6 Rf1 59. a7 then:
    • 59. -- Rf8 60. Kb7 Kxh3 61. a8Q Rf7+ 62. Kc6 is an elementary win for White.
    • After 59. -- Rf6+ 60. Kc5 Rf5+ 61. Kb4 Rf8 62. b6 if the Rook leaves the eighth Rank, the a-pawn promotes; if the Rook remains on the eighth rank, White plays 63. b7.
  • Mr. Atalik resigns.

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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-21-07 04:15 PM
Response to Reply #3
8. Nepomniachtchi - Bosboom, Corus C, Round 4, Wijk aan Zee



Ian Nepomniachtchi
Phonto: ChessBase.de (Germany)

Ian Nepomniachtchi vs. Manuel Bosboom
Corus International Tournament Group C, Round 4
Wijk aan Zee, January 2007

Closed Sicilian Game: Grand Prix Opening


1. e4 c5 2. Nc3 d6 3. f4 e6 4. Nf3 a6

  • If 4. -- Nc6 5. Bc4 then:
    • 5. -- Nf6 6. d3 Be7 7. 0-0 0-0 8. Qe1 a6 9. a4 Qc7 10. Bd2 Rd8 11. e5 dxe5 12. fxe5 Nd5 13. Qg3 Nd4 14. Nxd4 Nxc3 15. bxc3 cxd4 16. cxd4 Rxd4 17. Qf2 gives White more space, firm control of the f-file and a possible attack on Black's King (Aronian-Munizaba. WCh U12, Bratislava 1993).
    • More to Blck's liking would be 5. -- g6 6. 0-0 Bg7 7. d3 Nge7 8. Qe1 0-0 9. f5 d5 10. Bb3 c4 11. dxc4 dxe4 12. f6 Bxf6 13. Nxe4 Bg7 14. Bg5 yielding a level game.
5. a4 Nf6 6. g3!?

  • 6. d3 Nc6 7. g3 Qc7 8. Bg2 Be7 9. 0-0 0-0 10. h3 Rd8 11. g4 d5 12. e5 Ne8 13. g5 Bf8 14. Ne2 Ne7 15. Ng3 Nf5 16. Qe1 b6 17. Bd2 Bb7 18. Nxf5 exf5 is equal Milla-Garca, Op Trmt, Malaga (Spain) 2001).
6. -- Nc6

  • 6. -- b6 7. Bg2 Bb7 8. d3 Nc6 9. 0-0 Be7 10. Kh1 Qc7 11. Be3 draw agreed (I. Almasi-Csom, First Saturday, Budapest 11. 1995).
  • 6. -- Be7 7. Bg2 Nc6 8. d3 Qb6 9. b3 0-0 10. Bd2 Nd4 11. a5 Qa7 12. h3 Bd7 13. Be3 Rad8 14. Na4 Bc6 15. Nb6 Nxf3+ 16. Bxf3 Nd7 17. Nc4 b5 18. axb6 Nxb6 19. Na5 Ba8 is equal (Wetterling-Raszelenberg, Dortmund ABC 2004).
7. Bg2 Rb8 8. 0-0

  • 8. d4 cxd4 9. Nxd4 Qb6 10. Nb3 Be7 11. Qe2 0-0 12. a5 Qd8 13. Be3 Nd7 14. 0-0 b5 15. axb6 Nxb6 16. Rfd1 Qc7 17. Bf1 gives White a spatial edge on the kingside/center (Buchenau-Holz, Op Trmt, Leipzig 1995).
8. -- Be7!?

  • Black introduces a novelty. It should facilitate castling.
  • 8. -- b5 9. axb5 axb5 10. d3 b4 11. Ne2 Qb6 12. Kh1 h5 13. Nh4 Be7 14. Be3 d5 15. e5 Ng4 16. Bg1 Bxh4 17. gxh4 Ne7 18. Ng3 gives White an egde in piece activity and he is threating to win a pawn by 19. Nxh5 Rxh5 20. Qxg4 (Lopez-Zair, Op Trmt, St. Cugat 1997).
9. h3 b5 10. axb5 axb5 11. d3

  • White solidifies his central pawn.
  • 11. Re1 b4 12. Na4 d5 13. exd5 Nxd5 14. d3 Ra8 15. b3 0-0 16. Bb2 gives White a small edge in piece activity.
11. -- b4 12. Ne2 h5?

  • Black should complete his development before making moves like this.
  • Correct is 12. -- 0-0 13. Re1 Bb7 14. e5 when:
    • 14. -- dxe5 15. Nxe5 Nxe5 16. fxe5 Nd5 17. Bd2 is equal.
    • 14. -- Nd5 15. d4 Qb6 16. exd6 Bxd6 17. Qd3 Ra8 is level.
13. b3?!

  • This does not full advantage of Black's premature aggression.
  • If 13. e5 Nd5 14. d4 then:
    • 14. -- Bb7 15. Qd3 h4 16. g4 Qc7 17. exd6 Bxd6 18. dxc5 Bxc5+ 19. Kh1 gives White much greater mobility.
    • 14. -- h4 15. g4 Qc7 16. Qd3 cxd4 17. Nfxd4 Nxd4 18. Qxd4 Qxc2 19. exd6 Bxd6 20. Qxg7 give White the more aggressive position.
13. -- Bb7 14. Bb2 Qb6 15. Rf2 d5 16. e5?

  • White lets his advantage slip away.
  • Correct is 16. Nd2 Rd8 17. b5 h4 18. g4 dxe4 19. Nxe4 exf5 20. Nxf6+ when White continues to enjoy the more active pieces.
16. -- Nd7 17. f5

  • 17. d4 0-0 18. dxc5 Bxc5 19. Ned4 Ra8 20. Rd2 Rxa1 21. Bxa1 is level.
17. -- exf5 18. Nf4 Nd8 19. Nd2

  • If 19. d4 Ne6 20. Qd3 then:
    • After 20. -- cxd4 21. Qxf5 g6 22. Qd3 Ndc5 23. Qd1 Ne4 gives Black an extra pawn and he is threaning to take the exchange on f2.
    • After20. -- Nxd4? 21. Nxd4 cxd4 22. Nxd5 Bxd5 23. Bxd5 Qc5 24. Qxd4 White is unable to protect his f-pawn.
19. -- h4

  • 19. -- Bg5 20. Nxd5 Bxd5 21. Bxd5 Be3 22. Nc4 Bxf2+ 23. Kxf2 gives White the edge in the center.
  • 20. g4 c4 21. bxc4?

    • If 21. Bxd5 then:
      • 21. -- c3 22. Nc4 Qc7 23. Bc1 Nxe5 24. Bxb7 Nxc4 24. bxc4 Rxb7 26. Nd5 gives White a slight initiative.
      • 21. -- Bc5? 22. d4 Bxd4 23. Bxd4 Qxd4 24. Nxc4 Qxd1+ 25. Rxd1 White takes the f-pawn, for example: 25. -- Bxd5 26. Nxd5 Nc6 27. Rxf5.


Black: Manuel Bosboom
!""""""""#
$ T Ml+ T%
$+v+mVoO %
$ W + + +%
$+ +oPo+ %
$ Op+ NpO%
$+ +p+ +p%
$ BpN Rb+%
$R +q+ K %
/(((((((()

White: Ian Nepomniachtchi
Position after 21. b3xc4

21. -- Bc5!

  • This is simple tactics: pin the Rook and win the exchange.
  • 21. -- fxg4? 22. Qxg4! Bc5 23. Raf1 Bxf2+ 24. Rxf2 d4 25. e6 Nxe6 26. Nxe6 fxe6 27. Bxd4 gives White superior piece activity and command of open lines.
22. d4!?

  • This pawn sacrifice looks dubious, but there may be nothing better for White.
  • If 22. Qe1 fxg4 23. hxg4 Bxf2+ 24. Qxf2 Qxf2+ 25. Kxf2 dxc4 26. Nxc4 Bxg2 27. Kxg2 b3 then:
    • 26. cxb3 28. Rxb3 29. Ra7 Nc5 of Black's two Rooks, one is supporting a passed pawn and the other is tying down White's minor pieces single-handed.
    • 23. Nd6+ Kf8 29. c4 Ne6 30. Nxe6+ fxe6 31. Rf11+ Kg8 give Black two passed pawns, both supported by Rooks.
22. -- Bxd4 23. Bxd4 Qxd4 24. cxd5

  • If 24. gxf5 dxc4 25. e6 Nf6 then:
    • 26. Bxb7 Rxb7 27. Qf1 Rc7 28. Ra4 Qc3 29. exf7+ Kxf7 is equal.
    • 26. c3 bxc3 27. Qa4+ Kf8 28. Qxc4 Qxc4 29. Nxc4 is level.
24. -- fxg4

  • Black is now a pawn up.
  • 24. -- Nxe5 25. gxf5 Ra8 26. Rxa8 Bxa8 27. Qe2 0-0 28. Qa6 Nb7 is balanced.
25. Ne2 Qxe5 26. Nc4!?

  • Black has won a second pawn.
  • The text move is not objectively the best, but the objectively best move doesn't do White a lot of good. So he goes for complications.
  • After 26. Nf4? 0-0 27. Nd3 Qc3 28. hxg4 Nf6 29. Ra5 Ra8 Black has an extra pawn and much more active pieces.
26. -- Qe7?

  • White's gamble pays dividends. Black misses an opportunity to take greater command of the game.
  • 26. -- Qc7 27. Qd4 gxh3 28. Bxh3 Nf6 29. Ra7 Rh5 30. Nf4 Rg5+ gives Black a strong initiative to go with his two extra pawns.
27. Nd4 Kf8

  • If Black makes any other move than the text, the Queen is lost to 28. Re2!.
  • If 27. -- 0-0 28. Qxg4! Nc5 then:
    • 29. Nf5 Qf6 30. Ra5 gives White the initiative on both wings.
    • 29. d6 Qd7 30. Nf5 g6 31. Ne7+ puts Black in a mating attack.


Black: Manuel Bosboom
!""""""""#
$ T M L T%
$+v+mWoO %
$ + + + +%
$+ +p+ + %
$ OnN +oO%
$+ + + +p%
$ +p+ Rv+%
$R +q+ K %
/(((((((()

White: Ian Nepomniachtchi
Position after 27. -- Ke8f8

28. Qxg4!

  • White launches the final assault with this aggressive Queen sortie.
  • 28. d6? Qg5 29. Ra5 Qg6 30. Qxg4 Qxg4 31. hxg4 Bxg2 32. Kxg2 h3+ leaves Black slightly better with an extra pawn.
28. -- Nf6

  • If 28. -- Nc5 then:
    • 29. Nf5 29. -- Qf6 30. Ra5 Ra8 31. Nfd6 Qe7 32. Nxb7 Qxb7 33. Rxc5 gives White an extra piece.
    • 29. d6 Qd7 30. Nf5 then:
      • After 30. -- Rh7! 31. Bxb7 Qxb7 32. Nxh4 Kg8 33. Nf5 Nc6 34. Qf3 Kh8 35. Qe3 all the piece activity is White's.
      • After 30. -- g6 31. Qd4 Rg8 32. Ne7 Bxg2 33. Kxg2 White resumes his attack.
29. Qf4 Ra8

  • 29. -- Rc8 30. d6 Qe8 31. Nb6 Bxg2 32. Rxg2 Rb8 33. d7 Qe4 34. Qxb8 White wins the Knight.
30. Rxa8 Bxa8 31. Qb8 Bxd5 32. Nf5 Qe1+

  • 32. -- Nd7 33. Nxe7 Nxb8 34. Nxd5 +-
33. Rf1 Qe8 34. Qxb4+ Kg8 35. Ne7+ Kh7 36. Ne3 1-0

  • There are two short variations for the coup de grace:
    • 36. -- Bc4 37. Rf4 wins the Bishop as Black must stop the threatened mate starting with 37. Rxh4+.
    • 36. -- g6 37. Qxh4+ Nh5 38. N3xd5 also wins a piece.
  • Mh. Bosboom resigns.

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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-21-07 04:16 PM
Response to Reply #3
9. Negi - Spoelman, Corus C, Round 1, Wijk aan Zee



Parimarjan Negi
Photo: ChessBase.com

Parimarjan Negi vs. Wouter Spoelman
Corus International Tournament, Group C, Round 1
Wijk aan Zee, January 2007

Spanish Grand Royal Game: Neo-Classical Defense (Arkangelsk Variation)


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. 0-0 b5 6. Bb3 Bb7 7. Re1 Bc5

  • Young Negi received some schooling in similar positions from Katya Lahno last month in their match in New Delhi. Although the lessons were painful, he may have learned much.
8. c3 0-0

  • If 8. -- d6 9. d4 Bb6 10. Bg5 h6 11. Bh4 then:
    • 11. -- 0-0 12. a4
      • 12. -- exd4 13. axb5 axb5 14. Rxa8 Bxa8 15. cxd4 Re8 16. Nc3 g5
        • After 17. Bg3 17. -- Na5 18. e5 Nxb3 19. Qxb3 Bxf3 20. gxf3 Bxd4 21. e6 fxe6 22. Nxb5 Bb6 23. Rxe6 Rxe6 24. Qxe6+ Kg7 Black's kingside pawns have some mobility (Kotronias-Dorfman, Lvov 1988).
        • 17. Qd2!?
          • 17. -- Na5 18. Bc2 b4 19. Nxg5
            • 19. -- bxc3 then:
              • 20. Qf4 Bxd4 21. Nh7 Be5 22. Qxh6
                • 22. -- Re6 23. Nxf6+ gives White an attack on the kingside (Penrose-Vukcevic, corr 1983).
                • After 22. -- Ng4 23. Qh5 f6 24. f4 Bd4+ 25. Kh1 White threatens Black's King.
              • After 20. bxc3 Qd7 21. Nf3 Nxe4 22. Qxh6 Qe6 23. Rxe4 Bxe4 24. Bf6 Qxf6 25. Qxf6 Bxc2 it is difficult to determine the material balance, but White's Queen on f6 gives him a slight positional plus.
            • After 19. -- hxg5? 20. Qxg5+ Kh8 21. Qh6+ Kg8 22. Bxf6 Black must surrender the Queen in order to avoid immediate mate.
          • 17. -- Nxd4 18. Nxd4 Bxd4 19. Qxd4 c5 20. Qe3 gxh4 21. Qxh6 gives White the edge; he will need to strive to involve more pieces in a kingside attack.
          • 17. -- gxh4 18. Qxh6 Nh7 19. Bxf7+ Kxf7 20. Qxh7+ gives White a vicious attack in compensation for the material deficit. He will brings his Knights forward and win.
      • 12. -- Re8 13. axb5 axb5 14. Rxa8 Bxa8 15. Qd3 exd4 16. cxd4 Na5 17. Bxf6 Qxf6 then:
        • 18. Bc2 Nc6 19. Qxb5 Bxd4 draw agreed (R. Byrne-Bisguier, US Ch, Oberlin, Ohio 1975).
        • After 18. h3 Nc6 19. Qxb5 Rb8 Black's pressure against the d-pawn will restore the material balance (Tukmakov-Dorfman, Soviet Armies TCh, Leningrad 1975).
    • 11. -- Qe7 12. a4 g5 13. axb5 axb5 14. Rxa8+ Bxa8 15. Bg3 h5 16. h4 g4 17. Nh2 exd4 is level (T. Ernst-Shirov, Arnold Cup, Gausdal, Oppland (Norway) 1991).
9. d4 Bb6 10. Be3

  • If 10. Bg5 h6 then:
    • 11. Bxf6 Qxf6 12. Bd5 d6 13. a4 Rab8 14. axb5 axb5 15. Na3 exd4 16. Bxc6 Bxc6 17. cxd4 g5 18. Nc2 g4 19. Nd2 Qg6 is level (Sax-Stefanova, ol, Istanbul 2000).
    • 11. Bh4 d6 12. a4 transposes to R. Byrne-Bisguier, supra
10. -- exd4 11. cxd4 Na5 12. Bg5 Nxb3 13. Qxb3!?

  • White blazes a new trial.
  • 13. axb3 h6 14. Bh4 g5 15. Nxg5 Nxe4 16. Nxe4 Qxh4 17. Nbc3 Kh8 18. Nc5 Bc6 19. g3 Rg8 give Black better mobility (Anand-Ivanchuk, IT, Belgrade 1997).
  • The text move, 13. Qxb3, is quite flexible. The Queen can help White focus on a complex of points near Black's King that may become weak or recapture at f3 without spoiling the castle wall.
13. -- h6 14. Bh4 g5?

  • With this and his previous move, Black weakens the squares on which White is focused. This drives the Bishop away, but only temporarily.
  • Correct is 14. -- Re8 then:
    • 15. Nbd2 when:
      • 15. -- Ba5 16. Qe3 d6 17. Rad1 Re6 18. Qf4 c6 19. Qf5 Qe8 20. Re2 c5 with equality.
      • On the other hand, if 15. -- g5? 16. Nxg5 hxg5 17. Bxg5 Bxe4 18. Nxe4 then:
        • after 18. -- Re6 19. Qg3 Nxe4 20. Rxe4 Rg6 21. Bxd8 Rxg3 22. Re8+ White wins.
        • White also wins after 18. -- Nxe4 19. Bxd8 Raxd8 20. Qd1 d5 21. Qg4+.
    • if 15. Bxf6?! Qxf6 16. Nc3 then:
      • 16. -- c5 17. dxc5 Bxc5 18. Rad1 d6 19. Nd5 Bxd5 20. exd5 Rac8 gives Black more mobility.
      • 16. -- Re7 17. a4 bxa4 18. Rxa4 Rae8 19. Nd5 Bxd5 20. Qxd5 c6 is level.
15. Nxg5 Nxe4

  • 15. -- Ba5 16. Re3 Nxe4 17. Rxe4 Bxe4 18. Qg3 hxg5 19. Bxg5 +- transposes into the text.


Black:
!""""""""#
$t+ W Tl+%
$+vOo+o+ %
$oV + + O%
$+o+ + N %
$ + Pm+ B%
$+q+ + + %
$pP + PpP%
$Rn+ R K %
/(((((((()

White:
Position after 15. -- Nf6e4:p

16. Rxe4!!

  • The sacrifice of the Rook leaves Black helpless.
  • 16. Nf3 Ng5 17. Nbd2 d6 18. Bxg5 hxg5 19. h3 give White only a small edge in space, which is no more secure than his d-pawn.
16. -- Bxe4

  • 16. -- hxg5 17. Rg4 Re8 18. Nd2 Re6 19. Rxg5+ Qxg5 20. Bxg5 +-
17. Qg3!

  • White chooses what is far and away the better way to complete the sacifice. He had to lose a minor piece as well.
  • If 17. Nxe4? Qxh4 18. Qd3 d6 19. g3 Qe7 20. Nbc3 f5 21. Nd2 Qg7 Black remains a Rook ahead and wins.
17. -- hxg5

  • 17. -- Bg6 18. Nxf7 Kxf7 19. Bxd8 Raxd8 20. Nc3 Bxd4 21. Qf4+ nets White another pawn.
18. Bxg5 Qe8 19. Bf6+ Bg6 20. Nc3!

  • 20. Nd2? puts White's position in jeopardy: 20. -- Qe2 21. Qh3 Qh5 22. Qxd7 Rae8 23. Nf1 Bf5 leaves White's Queen with an awkward escape route.
20. -- Qe6

  • If 20. -- Bxd4 21. Nd5 then:
    • After 21. -- Qe2 22. Bxd4 Rfe8 23. Nf6+ White wins the exchange.
    • After 21. -- Bxf6 22. Nxf6+ White take the Queen.
21. Qh4 Bh7 22. Qg5+ Bg6 23. Nd5

  • After 23. Ne4 Bxd4 24. Bxd4 Qxe4 25. Qf6 Black must sacrifice his Queen in order to avoid mate.
23. -- Bxd4 24. Bxd4 c5

  • If 24. -- Rfe8 25. h3 c5 26. Bf6 -- 27. Qh6 Qe1+ 28. Kh2 then:
    • 28. -- Qe5+ 29. f4 then:
      • 29. -- Qxf4+ 30. Nxf4 -- 31. Qg7#
      • 29. -- (any) 30. Qg7#
    • 28. -- Qg1+ 29. Rxg1 -- 30. Qg7#
25. Nf6+ Kg7 26. Ne8+ Kg8

  • 26. -- Kh7 27. Qh4+ Kg8 28. Qh8#
27. Qh6 1-0
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Guaranteed Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-21-07 04:16 PM
Response to Original message
10. Thanks for this... nt
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Jack Rabbit Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-21-07 04:25 PM
Response to Reply #10
11. You're welcome
!!
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Guaranteed Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-21-07 06:23 PM
Response to Reply #11
12. If I get some time later I might play out some of those games...
the Rauzer in particular looks fun. Doin homework now, though.
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