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2011's Tornadoes By the Numbers

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AsahinaKimi Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu May-26-11 10:01 PM
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2011's Tornadoes By the Numbers
Edited on Thu May-26-11 10:02 PM by AsahinaKimi


by Weather.com and Associated Press
Updated: May 26, 2011 at 10:35 a.m.

Figures about the tornado that ripped through Joplin, Mo., on Sunday and the 2011 tornado season. All statistics represent the official record of the National Weather Service, which covers 1950 to present day. For more perspective on this year's records, be sure to check out our special article on how unprecedented 2011 has been.



JOPLIN TORNADO

> People killed: 125
> Survivors rescued: 9
> Injured: More than 900
> Buildings destroyed: An estimated 8,000
> About the tornado: Storm Prediction Center says unofficial records show last single tornado with greater death toll occurred in 1947. National Weather Service rated the storm an EF5, the highest rating based on inflicted damage. Winds exceeded 200 mph.

MORE...
http://beta.weather.com/outlook/weather-news/news/articles/tornado-toll_2011-05-25
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Fumesucker Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu May-26-11 10:13 PM
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1. K&R, thanks for posting..
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msongs Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu May-26-11 10:24 PM
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2. probably causes for some of this data....
better weather technology - more tornados observed/identified in areas with fewer human observers.
more people - more tornados observed than in the past
more people living in tornado prone areas - more damage and casualties

lots of tornados simply went unobserved due to low population and lack of radar etc to observe them

If the Joplin tornado had been 40 miles out in the sticks it would barely rate a mention at all.

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Zoeisright Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu May-26-11 11:00 PM
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3. And this is just the beginning.
Have you seen this?

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2011/04/28/us/tornado-deaths.html?ref=us

Tornado deaths are exploding, even with improved warning systems, forecasting, and Doppler radar.
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